Our latest Featured Artist is the brilliantly talented Molly Lambourn, 22, who’s based in Canterbury, Kent. Molly is currently studying for her Masters Degree in Fine Art at UCA Canterbury. We admire her attention to detail and her work with ceramics makes a vivid impression. Read on to find out more…

How did you get started as an artist?

I have always created since childhood but I took the leap to start professionally as a Fine Artist after I completed my Undergraduate Degree. Having explored corporate work and teaching I was always drawn back to art. I am at the beginning of my career and I am currently completing a Master’s in Fine Art. 

What inspires you to be creative?

I think emotion drives a lot of my creativity. It’s my way of releasing emotions onto a page and exploring them further. It has been an important way for me to process my anxiety and is a cathartic release for any negativity. I see it as transforming ugly emotions into beautiful realities that let us escape. 

How would you describe your creative process?

I think it’s impulsive. I can wake up in the middle of the night with an idea and I won’t be happy until it has been realised on a page. I always have a few pieces on the go at once. 

What’s your favourite medium to work in and why?

I love working with Indian Ink, I love the mistakes that can come from it that you have to incorporate into the piece, and I love the way that you can use it for gorgeous flowing strokes contrasted with smaller intricate details. It feels freeing and forces you to be comfortable with error.

How do you tackle a blank canvas?

I have a vague idea of a pattern, shape or image I am interested in, so I begin to draw that and then see where it leads me. You must jump in, or you will spend forever worrying about what it might be. Enjoy the journey!

What do you find the most challenging about the creative process?

I think as artists we can become too concerned about what other people think and sometimes this can stop us from creating or make us create weaker work. I try to work for myself first; the second you start creating for an audience you will begin to lose what makes your work authentically you. 

In which ways do you differentiate your work from that of other creatives?

My work is autobiographical and linked heavily to emotion, capturing paticular moments of mundanity, anxiety and trauma. I think it is relentless and I think I am quite open about welcoming my audience into my world, my thoughts and beliefs about myself. My work is vulnerable and detailed, it looks beautiful but reveals darker realities. 

What are your most essential tools?

If I have some paper or a blank vessel to draw on, black fine liner pens, Indian ink and some tea – I am ready to go!

What’s your studio/workspace like?

My studio is a treasure trove of completed work, unfinished projects and found materials that I think might be useful for a future project. It’s stocked with pens, pencils and paint ready for whatever creative mood I find myself in! 

Any tips for preparing a portfolio?

Have a theme or clear focus, find something that keeps you up at night and then focus on that, as well as it looking good you want to be able to talk about it with passion. You want your portfolio to show the best of your work, so be selective and don’t try to show everything you have ever made. 

Do you have a favourite art tip that you can share with our readers?

When you have a creative block, I recommend drawing or painting for the sake of it, draw a favourite figure, animal or building. It doesn’t matter how bad it is, just clear your mind and eventually you will know what you need to do next.

Where can our readers find out more about you?

I have a website, Instagram and a Facebook page. I am available for commissions, exhibition work, workshops and collaborative enquiries. 

If you’d like be one of our future Featured Artists please get in touch! Email us at blog@cowlings.com with a few examples of your artwork and a little about yourself.

%d bloggers like this: